L'Deane Trueblood

Fountain of Youth

L'Deane Trueblood

Fountain of Youth

Bronze

40 x 27 in

Grace The Offering

L'Deane Trueblood

Grace The Offering

Bronze

68 x 25 in

Johnny's Wagon

L'Deane Trueblood

Johnny's Wagon

Bronze

36 x 19 x 43 in

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L'Deane Trueblood
Born in Norman Oklahoma, L'Deane Trueblood now resides in St. George, Utah, among the most spectacular redrock country in the southwest. She is the proud mother to three children, and grandmother to nine grandchildren. While she raised her family, she had the opportunity to live and travel across the United States as well as in Europe and the Middle East, as her husband served in command positions in the Air Force. After her children began to leave home, she turned to pursue other lifelong goals and resumed her art career full-time. Today, L'Deane Trueblood's sculptures and paintings are found in public and private collections throughout the United States, as well as internationally. She has received numerous national awards for sculpture and painting. Recently, she has also been commissioned to produce several larger-than-life monuments which now stand in prominent public spaces in several states. A slight turn of the head - A distant gaze - A moment of quiet poise. Such terms describe essential elements of L'Deane Trueblood's captivating bronze sculptures. Most often, however, observers are simply drawn to her portrayals of the human form through some deep-seated emotional pull rather than any analytical effort. Working mostly with children as subjects, she has created a series of highly sought-after, life-size bronzes that grace homes, gardens, and private collections all across the United States and abroad. "L'Deane Trueblood has reinvested this genre with bolder formulation, a subtler touch and more tender feelings. There is truthfulness in her work that satisfies and nourishes." - Vern Swanson, Director of the Springville Museum of Art When observing people - especially small children - interact with one of L'Deane Trueblood's sculptures you begin to understand their strong tactile allure, their imminent approachability. Children will touch their faces, hug them and peer inquisitively into their eyes, or even give them a kiss on the cheek. Adults are also compelled to touch the exquisitely smooth skin, a style that is a hallmark of the artist's work. Beneath the appeal of the beautiful surface is an elegant suggestion of motion which permeates any Trueblood piece. The poses are subtle, the motion implied, understated. With just a turn of a shoulder or the graceful gesture of a hand, L'Deane masterfully conveys a dynamism that few modern sculptors can match. People often have the need to physically trace this movement along the contours of the piece, to feel the "potential energy" that seems to radiate from the bronze. Another trademark of Trueblood sculpture is the quality of the faces. The expressions are introspective, contemplative, reflective. "I am drawn to poses and attitudes that reflect the rich inner life that is mostly invisible to us and somewhat mysterious." With her technique honed to a fine edge through a lifetime of experience and observation she deftly lifts the corner of a mouth, or shifts the focus of the eyes ever so slightly. But her mastery of the human face goes beyond the technique. "To me, a face reveals the history of a soul. I'm not so interested in just showing a child at play, but rather revealing the spirit within. If you watch children closely, there's so much that goes on inside them. I want to pay tribute to them, to celebrate their remarkable intelligence." Above all, it is this spiritual understanding that informs L'Deane Trueblood's art. "I have a strong conviction that the universe is filled with love and wonder. For me, this is a feeling that I want to communicate: This is a beautiful world, a nice place. Enjoy it!" While she was raising three children of her own, she put her art career on hold and earned her Master's degree in Early Education and for several years directed one of Utah's first fully-accredited Montessori preschools. As a full subscriber to the gentle philosophies and innovative methods of the famous teacher, Dr. Maria Montessori, L'Deane's work consistently reflects the innate dignity of the child and the noble genesis of the human soul. She goes on to say, "As a young fine arts student struggling with finding a direction in life, a teacher advised me to 'Make a simple statement'. I spent much of my life wondering what my statement could be. Now I see that I've been shaping it piece by piece every day." Figurative, representational art is the medium L'Deane has chosen to record that statement. She received her BFA with honors from the University of Oklahoma where she studied under Joe Taylor, a master of classical figurative sculpture. She then moved to Europe where she worked, studied, and traveled widely, becoming steeped in the traditions of the classical masters.
Artist